New Weimar Studies Network

March 31, 2011

The Weimar Studies Network (WSN) is an international platform for researchers and academics working on the history of the Weimar Republic. It offers information on recent publications, up-coming events and on-going research projects on the politics, culture and society of the interwar years in Germany. We would like to develop this forum into a permanent platform for scholars working on any aspect of the Weimar Republic. Besides regular postings on new research, publications and conferences, it offers a place for the exchange of ideas, to present current research interests and to draw on the knowledge of colleagues from all over the world. We welcome all contributions, like call for papers, new publications or conferences, as well as specific questions or problems you might have encountered in your research and that you would like to present to the network.The Weimar Studies Network website can be found athttp://weimarstudies.wordpress.com/If you would like to stay updated on the WSN, please subscribe to our Facebook page (

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Weimar-Studies-Network/186611858016163) and our Twitter feed (http://twitter.com/weimarstudies).

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The Economic Turn: Politics and the Contemporary Novel in Britain and Germany

November 4, 2010

The Swansea Centre for Research into Contemporary German Culture in conjunction with the Department of English invites all interested parties to the following seminars, taking place from next week. They are at Swansea University in Keir Hardie 250 at 4pm.

Each paper in this series examines one novel published over the last decade which engages with the politics of the Blair/Brown years in Britain (1997-2010) or the SPD coalitions in Germany (1998-2009).

10 November

Julian Preece

‘Diagnosing the Problem in Ulrich Peltzer’s Teil der Lösung’ (2007).

1 December

Joanne Leal, (Birkbeck, University of London)

‘The personal is (not) political: locating the contemporary subject in Katharina Hacker’s Die Habenichtse‘   

David Clarke (University of Bath)

Ghosts in the Machine: Kathrin Röggla wir schlafen nicht

 16 February

Daniel Lea (Oxford Brookes)

The Missing and the Lost: The Empty Space of Politics in Gordon Burn’s Born Yesterday

2 March

Martyn Colebrook (Hull)

‘The fact that there are conspiracy theories does not mean that conspiratorial politics do not also exist’: Eoin McNamee, 12:23 – Paris, 31st August 1997 and the politicization of the contemporary British Novel.   

16 March

Sarah Colvin (Institute of German Studies, Birmingham)

The mythos of winter? The post-capitalist landscape and post-terrorist nonviolence in Lukas Hammerstein’s Wo wirst du sein (2010).

(After Easter)

Katy Shaw (Brighton), Violence as Politics, Politics as Violence in David Peace’s GB84


New German Studies memory network announced

September 20, 2010

The Interdisciplinary Committee of the German Studies Association (GSA)
is pleased to announce the creation of a new network devoted to Memory
Studies. We invite you to become a part of our network and participate in this
new intellectual venture in interdisciplinarity.

The network will generally serve as a venue for the exchange of ideas,
but it will also be a place for the proposal and discussion of possible
themes for future panels on Memory Studies at upcoming GSA conferences.

To join up, please contact any of the network coordinators or go to the
newly-created facebook group, “German Memory Studies Network” and
register today!

We look forward to hearing from you.

Carol Anne Costabile-Heming
costabilec1@nku.edu

Irene Kacandes
Irene.Kacandes@Dartmouth.EDU

Gavriel Rosenfeld
grosenfeld@fairfield.edu